Washington: The Hits Keep on Coming as Magazine Ban Pulled to the Senate Floor

Gun Rights

On Friday, the Washington Senate pulled magazine ban legislation, Senate Bill 5078 to the Senate Floor where it is eligible for a vote for passage.  NRA Members and Second Amendment supporters probably recall this measure from last year, previously reported here.  Please contact your State Senator IMMEDIATELY and ask them to OPPOSE Senate Bill 5078.


Senate Bill 5078, bans the manufacture, possession, sale, transfer, etc., of magazines that “are capable of holding,” or hold more than, 12 rounds of ammunition.  This includes conversion kits or parts from which any such magazine may be assembled.  These so-called “high capacity” magazines are, in fact, standard equipment for commonly-owned firearms that many Americans legally and effectively use for an entire range of legitimate purposes, such as self-defense or competition.  For example, the Glock 19 was the most commonly purchased firearm of 2021 and has a standard-issue magazine that holds 15 rounds of ammunition. Those who own non-compliant magazines prior to the ban are only allowed to possess them on their own property and in other limited instances, such as at licensed shooting ranges or while hunting.  Prohibited magazines have to be transported unloaded and locked separately from firearms, and must be stored locked at home, making them unavailable for self-defense.  Any violation of this measure is a gross misdemeanor punishable by a maximum of 364 days in jail and/or a fine of up to $5,000.

Again, please contact your State Senator and ask them to OPPOSE Senate Bill 5078. 

You Might Like
You Might Like

Articles You May Like

The Cumulative 2022-2030 Climate Change Mitigation Market Will Total $48 Trillion, According to a New Report
California: San Jose Passes Tax & Insurance Requirement for Gun Owners
First Overnighter In The Woods
Alaska: NRA-Backed Emergency Powers Legislation Set for Committee Hearing
No, vigilante militias are not authorized by the Constitution, and Congress should outlaw them

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.